Thursday, May 21, 2015

Moises 'Political Economy from the Zapatista Communities II'

Political Economy from the Zapatista Communities II

Words of Subcomandante Insurgente Moisés. May 5, 2015


Good afternoon to everyone, compañeras, compañeros, brothers and sisters.
In response to what we have been listening to yesterday, and the day before, we have been commenting in the commission of compañeros and compañeras of the CCRI, that it seems to us that you can see there what it is that we want to do. This is the reason all of us are here, and if we haven’t been dreaming or sleeping, then we are thinking about the things that we have discussed, what the compas and brothers and sisters already brought up and talked about. They have already told us a lot about what this hydra is. So the question is what do we need to do against it?
Organize ourselves. When we give this response, organize ourselves, it means that our brain is already telling us what must be done first, and then second, and third, and fourth, and so on. And so, it’s an idea, when it is in your head it is an idea. Now, when you move your tongue, then it is in your words. What is still missing is action, that is, to organize. Now when you are organizing yourselves, watch out, because it isn’t going to come out like you thought in the idea, or like you said in the word. You are going to begin to encounter a lot of barriers, a lot of challenges.
Because if we don’t organize ourselves, we’re going to get to the year 2100, well, that is, those of us who are going to get there, and we’ll still be talking about ideas, words, and thoughts while capitalism has kept on, where were those of us who criticized capitalism so much? Where will we be if that’s how things are?
Ok, this is what we were reflecting on among the compas of the CCRI, of the Sixth Commission of the EZLN.

UN Denounces Criminalization of Indigenous Community Radios in Guatemala

UN Denounces the Criminalization of Indigenous Community Radios in Guatemala

On May 15, 2015, the Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination (CERD) denounced the criminalization of Indigenous community radio stations in Guatemala, after submitting its observations on the country, in Geneva, according to the International Convention on the matter.
"The criminalization of community radio, and subsequent detention of Indigenous journalists and closure of radio stations, which are an integral part in the communication of Indigenous peoples, is a new phenomenon" as explained by American citizen, Carlos Manuel Vazquez, one of 18 independent experts appointed by this Committee, who acted as rapporteur for the Guatemalan case, held in late April, and whose recommendations were made public today.

Wednesday, May 20, 2015

Mohawk Nation News 'S.S. GOOD MESSAGE, POWER & PEACE'

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“S.S. GOOD MESSAGE, POWER & PEACE”.


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MNN. May 20, 2015. It appears that The League of Nations, now known as the United Nations, is being seen for what it is. It’s the New World Order. It looks like the end is near for NATO and the bankers’ global fascist agenda.
All Aboard!
All Aboard!

Confederacy sent Deskaheh to spread the Great Peace.
Confederacy sent Deskaheh to spread the Peace.
In 1923 the League of Nations was convened in the Hague. They refused to hear our representative, Deskaheh. Instead the ongwe’hon:weh were placed on an accelerated path of genocide, particularly in Canada. Read the following link:
ongwe'hon:weh: "Who has the immigrant problem?"
The media is integrated with the military in concentration camp America.
Dekanawida explained to the people that if they are to find peace they must follow the laws of nature, because all of life is derived from these laws. He said they must respect each other, other nations and all creation in order to bring about peace and harmony among themselves and throughout the world.

These 133 nations are beginning a real revolution as thahoketoteh sings:


MNN Mohawk Nation News kahentinetha@mohawknationnews.com more news, books, workshops, to donate and sign up for MNN newsletters, go to www.mohawknationnews.com  More stories at MNN Archives.  Address:  Box 991, Kahnawake [Quebec, Canada] J0Lthahoketoteh@mohawknationnews.com for original Mohawk music visit thahoketoteh.ws
Harper Hates Everyone:
We learnt the one mind from the wolf. With the one mind, we can never be defeated.
We learned the one mind from the wolf. With the one mind, we can never be defeated.
“Tribal councils are small pox blankets, inimical to indigenous peoples traditional means of self-determination”. Dr. Richard Boylan.


http://mohawknationnews.com/blog/2015/05/20/s-s-good-message-power-peace/

Santa Barbara oil spill now stretches for 9 miles



Aerial photo of skimmer and oil spill courtesy of Joint Operation Center.


Santa Barbara oil spill now stretches for 9 miles 

by Dan Bacher
Censored News

State and federal government crews continue to monitor the clean up of a big oil spill off the coast of Santa Barbara as the size of the disaster has expanded. 

The spill from a ruptured pipeline owned by Plains All American Pipeline expanded overnight from 4 miles long to two slicks stretching 9 miles along the coast, according to the U.S. Coast Guard. The pipeline carries crude oil from to Flores to Gaviota.

Zapatista Comandanta Miriam on the Rights of Women

Comandanta Miriam. May 6, 2015

Comandanta Miriam


Good evening compañeros and compañeras.
I also have the chance to talk to you a bit about what the situation was for women prior to 1994.
Women suffered through a very sad situation since the arrival of the conquistadors. They stole our land and took our language, our culture. This is how the domination of caciquismo [local despotism] and landowners came into being alongside a triple exploitation, humiliation, discrimination, marginalization, mistreatment, and inequality.
The fucking bosses had us as if they were our owners; they sent us to do all the work on the haciendas, without caring if we had children, husbands, or if we were sick. They never asked if we were sick; if we didn’t make it to work, they sent their servant or slave to leave the corn in front of the kitchen so that we would make tortillas for them.
Much time passed like this, with us working in the bosses’ house. We ground the salt because the salt then was not the same as it is now, now it comes finely ground. The salt we used before came in large balls, and we women had to grind it. Women also ground the salt for the livestock, and shelled coffee when it was coffee harvest time. If we started at 6 in the morning, we finished at 5 in the evening. Women had to keep preparing the bags of coffee throughout the whole day.
This is how the women worked. Women were mistreated in their work, carrying water and all of that and paid miserably; they were only given a little handful of salt or a handful of ground coffee, that was the payment given to the women.
Years passed and women suffered like this. And when our babies cried and we nursed them, we were yelled at, made fun of, insulted physically; they said that we didn’t know anything, that we were useless, that we were a bother to them. They didn’t respect us and they used us as if we were objects.
They did whatever they wanted to a woman; they chose the pretty women or the pretty girls as their lovers, and left children all over the place; they didn’t care that the women suffered, they treated them like animals, with their children growing up without a father.
They sold us as if we were commodities during the acasillamiento[i]; there was never rest for us women.
I’m going to talk a little bit about the acasillamiento. Acasillamiento refers to when people go to the haciendas or ranches with their families and stay there and work for the boss. The men were the ones who did the work of planting coffee, cleaning the coffee fields, harvesting the coffee, clearing the pastures, planting the grass, all this work, taking care of the corn and bean fields. The men did this work for the boss.
Apart from this, there is another thing I could tell you about the acasillamiento, which are the mozos or slaves there, men and women who are always going to live on the hacienda. Those men or women that are slaves or mozos, who live at the hacienda, are men and women that sometimes don’t have family. For example, a family comes just to work on the hacienda, and sometimes the dad and mom get sick and die and the children are orphaned. The boss takes these children and raises them on the hacienda. And what do these children do? Its not like the bosses adopt them as an adoptive child, but rather as a slave. Those children grow and this is the work they are given: if the boss has a pet, or pets, such as a dog, a monkey, or some kind of animal, the boss has the mozo take care of it, care for the animal. Wherever the monkey goes, that’s where the child is; they have to take care of it, bathe it, clean where it sleeps. That’s how it works.
Later, when the boss has a party—because before the priests would come to the large haciendas of the bosses and baptize their children, or for a birthday, or to perform a marriage ceremony for his daughters—and afterwards they would have parties and tell the mozos to guard the door. They would have the mozo watch the door while they were celebrating with their colleagues and friends. The mozo guards the door, he can’t let even a dog come into where they are partying, and he has to be there all day, for as long as the boss’s party keeps going.
And the women slaves were the ones who made the food, washed the dishes, and took care of the boss’s son, or the children of the boss’s friends.
That is how the people on the haciendas lived, and they didn’t get to eat what was eaten at the gatherings; they had to drink pozol[ii] if there was pozol, eat beans if there were beans. That was all they ate, meanwhile the boss ate the good stuff, but with his friends.
Later, when the boss wanted to go to the city, from his hacienda to a city that is, say, a 6-day walk, themozo would go along. If the boss had children—sometimes the children are disabled—the mozo had to carry the boss’s child to the city. And if the boss’s wife came to the hacienda, the mozo goes again and carries the child back again.
And when they harvested coffee, in any harvest on the hacienda, the mozo had to be tending to the mules. I don’t know if you know about horses, but the mozo had to saddle and unsaddle the boss’s horse, herd the cattle, and take the loads to the city where the boss lives. If he lives in Comitán the mozo had to go all the way to Comitán. He had to leave the hacienda and go as the mule-driver. This is how many enslaved men and women suffered during that time.
If there are fruit tree orchards inside the hacienda and one of them climbed up to pick some fruit, the bosses wouldn’t let them. They got them down by whipping them, I don’t know if you know how the lash works; they would hit them with it. They can’t pick fruit without the boss’s permission because the entire harvest was to be taken to the city. This is how the men and women suffered.
After so much suffering by women and the exploitation during the acasillamiento, the men started realizing how their women were being mistreated. Some thought it better to leave the hacienda. One by one they started leaving and taking refuge in the mountains because these hill lands were not claimed by the plantation owners. So they took refuge there. They thought it better to leave so that the women would not continue to suffer on the hacienda.
After awhile in the mountains—and many spent a long time there—they realized that it was better to join together and form a community, and that’s how they came to live that way. They got together, talked, and formed a community where they could live. That is how they formed the community.
But again, once they were living in the communities, those ideas that came from the boss or the acasilladowere brought in. It’s as if the men drug these bad ideas along with them and applied them inside the house. They acted like the little boss of the house. It’s not true that the women were liberated then, because the men became the little bosses of the house.
And once again the women stayed at home as if it was a jail. Women didn’t go out; they were shut in their houses once again.
When girls are born, we are not welcomed into the world because we are women; when a little girl was born, it is as if we were not loved. But if a boy was born, the men celebrated and were content because they are men. They brought this bad custom from the bosses. That’s how it was for a long time. When girls were born they acted as if women were useless, and if a boy was born, as if they could do all of the work.
But one good thing they did was that they did not lose the memory of how to form a community; they began to name community representatives and hold meetings and gatherings together. It was good that this idea was not lost, it wasn’t taken away and it came to life again. The bosses and the conquest wanted to make this culture disappear, but the bosses were wrong, because the people could still form their community.
Another thing is that the man gives the orders in the house and the women obey what he says. And if he tells you that you’re going to get married, you have get married. He’s not going to ask you if you want to get married to the man who came to ask for your hand; your father already accepted the liquor they offered, he drank it already and this obligates you to go with this man that you do not love.
This is how we came to suffer once again with our husbands because they told us that women are only useful in the kitchen, or to take care of their husbands, or to take care of the children. The men didn’t hold their children; they didn’t support the women. They only gave you the child, and then who cares how the child is raised. And—I’m going to talk about how it really was for years—we women often say that a baby was born every year, every year and a half, growing up like a little staircase, every year or year and a half there is another one. But the father didn’t care if his wife was suffering because she had to carry firewood, plant the cornfield, clean the house, sweep, take care of the animals, wash the clothes, take care of the children, change the diapers, and all of that. All of that was women’s work.
This is why we say that we suffered triple exploitation as women. Women had to be awake and in the kitchen at 3 or 4 in the morning, depending on how much time the men needed to get to their fields. The women had to get up early to make pozol, coffee, and breakfast for the men. The men go to work, and when they come back in the afternoon they want the water for their bath to have been carried up to the house already and be ready for them to bathe. The men bathe and then leave the house to walk around, to play, and the women are once again stuck at home the whole day, until the night—around this time right now—the women are still awake; they don’t go to sleep until 8.
So we were really suffering. The men didn’t care if you were sick, or how you felt, they didn’t ask—that’s just how it was. That is how women really lived; we’re not lying because that is how we lived.
When you would go to church or a ceremonial center for a festival, and women did go sometimes, you had to lower your head. You couldn’t raise your head, you had to walk with your head bowed, without turning to the sides, and covering your head with the rebozo [shawl] like this, so that just your face shows.
A lot of time went by like this, during which men dragged along these bad ideas, these bad learnings. That is how it happened, compañeros. As if we were nothing. As if only the men could be authorities, only the men could go into the street and participate.
There was no school. Later on in some communities there was school, but we didn’t go because we were women; they didn’t let us go to school because if we went they’d say that we only went to school to find a husband. And that it was better to learn to work in the kitchen because if we were indeed going to have a husband, we needed to learn how to take care of him.
And when our husband hit us, when he insulted us, we couldn’t complain. If we asked for help from the other institutions of the bad government they were much worse because they defended the men, and said the men are right; and so we remained silent, humiliated, and embarrassed at being women.
We didn’t have the right to come to meetings to participate, and they said that we were stupid, useless, and that we weren’t worth anything. They left us at home. We did not have freedom.
There was no health care. Even where there were clinics and hospitals that belonged to the bad government, they wouldn’t see us because we didn’t know how to speak Spanish. And sometimes we had to return to our homes, and many women and children died of curable diseases; we weren’t worth anything to them, and they discriminated against us because we were indigenous. They said that we were just dirty barefoot indians, and we couldn’t enter the clinics or hospitals. They wouldn’t let us, they only took care of people with money.
All this we suffered in our own flesh. We never had the opportunity to say what we felt for many years, because of the teachings of the conquistadores and the bad governments.
That is all, compañeros. Another compa will continue.
[i] Indicates the time period in which the caciques, or local land bosses, held great expanses of land and had almost total power over the indigenous workers in a kind of indebted servitude.
[ii] Pozol is a drink made from ground maize mixed with water and often consumed in the Mexican countryside as a midmorning or midday meal.

Migrant Trail Walk exposes crimes against humanity in US




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The annual Migrant Trail Walk begins May 25, 2015. This comes just after the United States lied, and concealed the facts, before the UN Human Rights Council in Geneva, about the imprisonment of migrant children, which is a violation of international law. Further, during the Universal Periodic Review, Mexico challenged the US to account for the murders of its citizens by US Border Patrol agents. The abuse of migrants, including Indigenous Peoples, has been fueled by the racist media and racist politicians, while corporations including GEO and CCA have profiteered from the mass imprisonment of migrants, including women and children. The death toll continues on the US border, including on the Tohono O'odham Nation, where laws restrict offering a glass of water to a dying migrant. -- Censored News

12th Annual Migrant Trail Walk Draws Attention to the Thousands of Migrant Deaths at U.S.-Mexico Border  


By Chandra Russo, English Language
Gloria Ivonne Moreno, Spanish Language
azmigranttrail@gmail.com
Dutch translation below by Alice Holemans, NAIS Gazette

Press Conference
Monday, May 25, 2015
10:00 AM
317 W. 23rd Street
Tucson, Arizona
TUCSON, Ariz. -- On May 25, 2015, more than fifty participants from the United States, Canada, Mexico, Colombia, and Central America will once again walk 75-miles over the course of a week to call attention to the human rights crisis occurring on the southern border. The twelfth annual Migrant Trail: We Walk for Life is a multi-national endeavor of allies who hail from diverse regions, faith backgrounds, ages, and ethnicities and walk together in solidarity with our migrant friends and their families to demand an end to migrant deaths on the border.
Since the 1990s, more than 6,000 men, women and children have lost their lives crossing the U.S.-Mexico border, a direct result of flawed U.S. border and immigration policies that have intentionally diverted migration into more isolated and desolate terrain.  As the summer approaches, and Arizona temperatures enter the searing triple-digits, the number of migrants who will perish from dehydration and exposure dramatically increases. Participants of the Migrant Trail undertake this yearly trek to demand a stop to these preventable deaths.
“For twelve years, we have stood in solidarity with migrants and their families. Each year, we hope that it will be the year that our elected officials will listen, that the human death toll will be enough to demand immediate change. This year is no different, and it pains us that thousands of deaths are not enough to sway public policy in the direction of protecting human life,” says Kat Rodriguez of the Colibrí Center for Human Rights and the Indigenous Alliance Without Borders, who has helped to organize the walk since its inception in 2004. Rodriguez has spent nearly a decade assisting families who are searching for lost loved ones.
“Whatever we do and do not believe about security on this border, some facts are indisputable. Thousands of men, women, and children have died avoidable deaths. Our border policies funnel them year after year into the most hostile and desolate areas of the Sonoran desert.  This can and must be stopped,” adds Todd Miller, the recent author of Border Patrol Nation: Dispatches from the Frontlines of Homeland Security and a founding organizer of the Migrant Trail. Miller has worked on and written about border issues for over fifteen years.
The Migrant Trail will begin Monday, May 25th at 2:00pm in Sásabe, Sonora.  Carpools will depart at 10:45 am from Southside Presbyterian (317 W. 23rd Street) immediately following the press conference.  Participants will arrive on Sunday, May 31st at 11:30 am to Kennedy Park, Ramada #3, for a closing ceremony. The Migrant Trail is a non-violent, family-friendly event, and is free and open to the community.  Participants and organizers of the Migrant Trail call on all people of conscience to stand in solidarity with our migrant sisters and brothers.

Espanol:

Tuesday, May 19, 2015

Mohawk Nation News 'Ten Steps to Regime Change'

TEN STEPS TO REGIME CHANGE

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MNN. 18, 2015. The Indian Lands Acts of 1924 established the POW camps called “Indian Reserves” IR throughout Canada. Bill C-51 is Canada’s latest attempt to legalize genocide. Here are ten steps to illegally dismantle the ongwe’hon:weh through corporate regime change, relocation or unwitnessed lethal procedures.
"They were demanding decent water and housing!!"
“They wanted decent water and housing!!”
1.The military response unit is located at the high tech Indian Affairs “war room”, directed by a well-briefed investigator and surveillance head. He reports to a senior commissioned officer. Federal, state and provincial entities work together to benefit from eliminating the ongwe’hon:weh. Top brass, all units in the detail and the local band councils work together. Military response teams surround all IRs. Operations are planned years in advance.
2.Detailed reporting on all incidents, including rumors and concocted stories. Surveillance is constant. Agents infiltrate the community in various guises. A “to be taken out” list is created.
3.Soldiers & CSIS/CIA agents are imbedded in media to control information, turn the public against the target, film the operation for study and identification.
Isn't it time for you to sit down and talk with us?
Isn’t it time for you to sit down and talk with us?
4.The media induces fear into the surrounding communities promoting fear and anger towards any  ongwe’hon:weh. In 1990 the surrounding communities requested the military attack the Mohawks. Command posts are set up at a moment’s notice to go into the IR once the conflict is created. “New management” or lethal force is demanded. This historical record continues. See below “Rocks at Whisky Trench”.
5.The “economic hit man” pays off the band and tribal council for their cooperation. Chiefs liaise constantly with the military. Secret meetings are held at local golf courses. The commander is involved during the “live” operation.
"They never quit fighting to keep their land from us!"
“Our mother can never ever be sold!”
6.Professionals, elders, men, women and children are targeted to silence them. Some are banished. Businesses are controlled or burnt destroyed.
7.Provocateurs, informants, infiltrators, workers and goons watch and report to the investigator. They are trained to befriend, create dissent, spread false rumors, pacify or carry out local attacks, or conflicts to divide the people, with impunity.
8.Band councils sign blank arrest warrants. Local cops stand by while targeted residents are threatened. Some incidents are “false flags” to mislead the people and heighten tension. The ensuing chaos eventually discredits cops and band councils. The military comes in to control the situation.

"I just outlawed the INDIANS!!!
“The people will wipe that smile off your face later this year, Stevie”!!!
9.The band and tribal councils agrees to come under the control of a political and economic corporation to create ‘peace’. Martial law is established. Roads closed. Houses searched. Curfews. No civil rights. Trouble makers removed. A combination of theatre, coercion and threats to control everybody and to bring about the desired corporate regime. Perpetrators report they were “just following orders” and can’t remember doing anything wrong, until they are charged with human rights abuses and genocide!
10.The law of the land of Great Turtle Island is the Kania’nereh:kowa. It shall prevail.
2001 interrogation of Dennis Blythe, BCI Bureau of Criminal Investigation on the INDIAN Detail conducted May 18, 1997, by the Onondaga Council of Chiefs Inc. and New York State against the Rotinoshonni. US District Court, Northern District of NY. [Ronald Jones vs. NYS 98 CV 374.]  
Paul Rogers of Bad Company tells us how the seagull from his high vantage point sees things much more clearly: “Seagull, you fly across the horizon, into the misty morning sun. Nobody asks you where you are going. Nobody knows where you’re from. And you fly through the sky, never asking why.” 
MNN Mohawk Nation News kahentinetha@mohawknationnews.com more news, books, workshops, to donate and sign up for MNN newsletters, go towww.mohawknationnews.com  More stories at MNN Archives.  Address:  Box 991, Kahnawake [Quebec, Canada] J0Lthahoketoteh@mohawknationnews.com for original Mohawk music visit thahoketoteh.ws
Sell ongwe’hon:we land to foreign entities













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